With a combined experience of more than 75 years Euroclad's technical department provide thoroughly researched and accurate solutions for today’s roofing and cladding problems. Whilst not a design or detailing service, we advise on detail, can assess specifications other than our standard or Elite Systems for structural, thermal and acoustic performance and will generally endeavour to respond to all queries within 72 hours.

Our technical team liaise with bodies such as the Institute of Roofing, MCRMA and Construction Skills to ensure our information is not only up to date with relevant construction guidelines but also relevant to the needs and requirements of our customers

With a balanced blend of practical experience and technical knowledge, complemented by state-of-the-art computer software we aim to provide sensible solutions to any aesthetic technical problem arising from design, environmental or performance issues.

The technical department provide all the specifications and drawings provided by Euroclad® whilst responding to the constant stream of technical quotes and supplying the group with research and development facilities

Technical

ACOUSTICS

An important part of building design is considering the internal working environment - for office, residential, education and leisure, acoustics is one of the most important factors to consider.  There are three characteristics to consider - Sound Reduction, Sound Absorption and Sound Intensity.

Sound Reduction

Sound reduction is the ability of a system to prevent sound from passing through it. This is principally achieved by reflecting the sound back towards its source. This is important where working environments require external noise sources to be reduced, or equally where internal production and machinery noise must be prevented from causing noise pollution.  Built-up systems, in general, perform remarkably well, offering excellent levels of sound reduction, typically in the order of 40 or more decibels reduction. This is because of the makeup of the system, with breaks and interfaces across the system that serve to reduce noise transmission.

Sound Absorption

Sound Absorption is important where the internal environment may generate noise which should be prevented from reverberating within the building. In order to achieve this, a perforated liner sheet is used and dense acoustic mineral fibre insulation used to absorb the sound energy within the construction. A small part of the noise may be reflected back within the building, but most of the noise energy will either escape through the system or be absorbed within it. Built up systems can accommodate acoustic absorption easily, by simply substituting the normal liner profile for perforated liner, including an acoustic insulation slab within the build-up and a separate polythene vapour control layer to maintain the air tightness of the system. The result is a very good level of acoustic absorption.

Sound Intensity

Sound Intensity is a measure of the rain noise that may be experienced inside the building during a sever downpour. Generally, systems with a good sound reduction perform better, i.e. have a lower sound intensity. Tests comparing various different systems, from composite panels, single ply membranes, trapezoidal profiles and low-pitch systems, demonstrated that Aluminium Standing Seam roof system performs very well, and have a very low sound intensity (40 decibels at 1000 hertz frequency).

FIREWALLS

Construction of an External Firewall

In accordance with Building Regulations, it is sometimes necessary for certain elements of a building to have a specified period of fire resistance. The regulations vary according to the element and the distance from the boundary. The systems that Euroclad® has had tested at approved fire research centres are applicable given that the following criteria are met.

  • Position: The firewall must be 1m or more from the boundary measured from the outer face of the cladding.

  • Type of Building: In accordance with regulation B2 of the Building Regulations it must be as defined

  • Height: Paragraph 13.7, Section 13, Part B4 of the Building Regulations states that "In a building with a storey 18m or more above ground level, insulation material used in ventilated cavities in the external wall construction should be of limited combustibility..." (Or be non-combustible)

  • Special Requirements by Local Authorities: It may be that local interpretations of building regulations vary or that the building merits special consideration. It is essential that the building designer confirms that the Euroclad® system selected complies with the relevant local authority requirements.

  • Direction: Euroclad's standard firewall systems offer protection from the inside of the building. However, symmetrical firewall systems are also available which protect against fire attack from either direction, inside to out, or outside to in.

  • Structural Frame: The fire resistant system must be fixed to sheeting rails, which are fixed to supporting cleats through slotted holes with the bolt incorporating a plastic or low-melt washer - both elements having the purpose of assisting movement due to thermal expansion in the event of a fire. The rails are to be at maximum 2080mm centres, and all bottom sheeting rails should be single pan. All sheeting rails should be shorter than standard to allow an expansion gap. The remainder of the frame must be protected to the same period of protection as the rest of the wall.

  • Support of Wall: When the sheeting rails heat up during a fire they will no longer function as a structural member. To prevent the wall moving downwards under its own weight, either a base support or securing to a protected eaves beam is required. This will allow the wall to continue to be supported during a fire, even when the sheeting rails are no longer providing adequate support.

In general terms the actual construction of a built up system firewall is relatively simple as laid out below. Please note that this information is intended as a summary only, and full detailed information should be obtained from the Euroclad Firewall technical publication.

Vertical Sheeting - Stone Wool Insulation

Utilising a Rockwool cladding roll a simple fire wall construction is achieved, offering a typical rating of 4 hours integrity and 15 minutes insulation. Where 30 minutes insulation rating is required the additional precaution of liner sheet stitching is required.

Vertical Sheeting - Glass Wool Insulation

When a glass fibre insulation quilt is used, it is necessary to introduce a minimum 20mm air gap between the insulation and the liner sheet. As the insulation is therefore normally compressed over the spacer bar, this system has fallen out of favour with most contractors as it is more awkward to install and is deeper than an equivalent U value normal construction.

Vertical Sheeting - Symmetrical Fire Wall 

This system uses the same principles as a rock fibre installation construction, but has the added precaution of the stitching the liner sheet, and sealing the liner with an intumescent sealant strip to the end and side laps.

Horizontal Sheeting - Stone Wall Insulation

Due to the orientation of the spacer bar (vertically installed), the support of the insulation has, in the past, proved an issue in providing a horizontal firewall construction. However, by using a flexible slab stone wool installation, this issue is over come, and a quick and easy horizontal firewall cladding solution is now available. Note that the spacer bar does require a thermal break strip installed to the face of the bar, 12mm deep x 50mm wide continuous strip. It is therefore essential that torque settings on fixing guns are correctly set and care taken during installation to prevent 'dishing' around fixings.

Horizontal Sheeting - Symmetrical Fire Wall

As with the vertical symmetrical fire wall, the added precaution of stitching the liner sidelaps, and using an intumescent sealant to the end and side laps enables a symmetrical fire wall construction, offering protection against fire attach from either inside or outside the building.

NON-FRAGILITY STATUS

In summary ACR(CP)001: 2003 Recommended Practice for Work on Profiled Sheeted Roofs states:

  • That a non-fragile assembly should be specified
  • That a competent company is chosen to carry out roof work
  • That the classification of the roof assembly can be confirmed by the supplier and that test data can be provided to support the classification
  • That drawings are available which can be used to set out the sequence of operations to fit sheets to a non-fragile classification
  • That the conditions affecting guarantees of non-fragility should be clearly stated
  • That special consideration should be given to Class C constructions
  • That specific information relating to maintenance of the products and which is relevant to non-fragility is provided for inclusion in the health and safety file  
  • That materials handling should be reduced wherever possible i.e. by ordering sheets to be packed in sequence as they will be used or by splitting packs on the ground before positioning on the roof

In addition the HSE Question and Answer Brief for the Construction Industry on the Work at Height Regulations 2005 states that "Collective control measures should always take priority over personal control measures" Euroclad Elite Systems comply to all of the above. 


All elements should be regarded as Fragile until fixed to the specified standards.

19/1000 LINER - 0.4mm STEEL

19/1000 0.4mm thick steel liner profile, fixed as shown in 'Euroclad Ltd Drawing FR4', can be classified C non-fragile on any span up to and including 1.8 m, for both in plane and curved roofs, and for spans up to 1.8 m on hips with any angle.

Also see ACR (CP)001:2007REV3 Recommended Practice for Work on Profiled Sheeted Roofs Annex B which gives recommendations regarding the use of crawl boards and gives a great deal of guidance about the usage of Class C Assemblies and the potential risks which need to be managed and considered.

The document recognises the potential risk from elements being "engineered to pass" Class C being "close to the boundary between fragile and non-fragile". Euroclad did not engineer the system to pass, allowed a good margin for site error and normal site practice and this was confirmed by an independent consultant. 

MW5 LINER - 0.7mm STEEL 

MW5 - 0.7mm thick steel liner profile, fixed as shown in 'Euroclad Ltd Drawing FR3', can be classified B non-fragile on any span up to and including 2.1 m, for both in plane and curved roofs, and for spans up to 2.1 m on hips with any angle.

MW5 ROOF PROFILE - 0.7mm STEEL

MW5- 0.7mm thick steel roof profile, fixed as shown in 'Euroclad Ltd Drawing FR14', can be classified B non-fragile on any span up to and including 2.1 m, for both on plane and curved roofs, and for spans up to 2.1 m on hips with any angle. 

32/1000 ROOF PROFILE - 0.7mm STEEL

32.1000 - 0.7mm thick steel roof profile, fixed as shown in 'Euroclad Ltd Drawing FR15', can be classified B non-fragile on any span up to and including 2.1 m, for both in plane and curved roofs, and for spans up to 2.1 m on hips with any angle.

EUROSEAM® ESA400 ROOF PROFILE - 0.9mm ALUMINIUM

Euroseam® ESA400 - 0.9mm thick aluminium profile. fixed as shown in 'Euroclad Ltd Drawing FR16', can be classified B non-fragile on any span up to and including 2.1 m, for both in plane and curved roofs and for spans up to 2.1 m on hips with any angle.

SF500 PROFILE - 0.7mm STEEL

SF500 - 0.7mm steel profile, fixed as shown in 'Euroclad Ltd Drawings FR17' can be classified B non-fragile on any span up to and including 2.1 m, for both in plane and curved roofs and for spans up to 2.1 m on hips with any angle.  

ROOFS

Re use the building

One of the most sustainable approaches to construction is to refurbish an existing structure. Euroclad products and systems lend themselves to refurbishment applications perfectly and can help achieve a faster, more cost-effective build with less local disruption and reduced environmental impact, giving a new lease of life to a previously undesirable building. Modern methods of construction and innovative materials can transform tired and outdated buildings into attractive and inspiring places. In addition to the social benefits, refurbishments  can be more economical even when the complete building envelope needs replacing. The majority of the building fabric can be retained, saving a significant amount of time and money. In addition, by reusing the functioning parts of the building, the impact on the environment is lowered, with material production and transport being greatly reduced.

Over-roofing

Over-roofing is often the best option for refurbishing existing roofs which have come to the end of their functional life or become uneconomic to repair. This method of refurbishment avoids the cost of stripping and disposing of the redundant material. minimises the disruption to occupancy and allows uninterrupted use of the building. Not all roofs are suitable and consideration must be given to the structural stability of the original framing and secondary purlins and its ability to withstand increased loading. Interstitial condensation within the construction and its effect on hidden components must be given due consideration. The safety of operatives working on the roof is also a crucial factor that must be considered.

Refurbishment Solutions

There are many situations when it can make more sense to refurbish and upgrade a building rather than demolish it and start again. Metal roofing is ideal for refurbishment as a replacement or over-cladding solution. Each refurbishment solution can be tailored to the building owner's requirements and to the character of the project. The main categories of roof refurbishment are outlined below. 

Built-up, insulated over roof system

This form of over-roofing is ideal for failing pitched roofs of any material. The new roof provides long, trouble-free life. The system retains the old roof cladding for use as a liner with minimal disruption to the inside of the building. Quattro bar spacer brackets are attached over the old sheeting into the purlins to provide an insulation space. New insulation is added to reduce heat loss and maintain internal temperature according to current building regulations. Finally, the external sheet is installed. If required the existing roof covering can be removed and replaced with a metal liner panel in combination with improved insulation.

Metal standing seam pitched over-roof

Standing seam roofing is a well established, premium roofing system that can achieve a wide range of acoustic and thermal performances. The lightweight roof puts a limited amount of extra load on the existing structure making it ideal for refurbishment. It is a ventilated system which is perfect for over-roofing a failed roof that may have been compromised and subsequently contains water; moisture can escape the roof as a vapour because of the inherent ventilation of a standing seam system. It also offers an opportunity to enhance the building's thermal performance and change its appearance. By increasing the amount of insulation beneath the external sheet, higher U-values can be achieved.

Flat to pitch framed roof systems

Flat to pitch conversions completely transform the appearance of a building. In some cases, they are the only effective way of waterproofing the existing roof structure but do require a detailed structural survey to be carried out. This is to ensure that the existing roof structure or supporting wall are capable of withstanding the additional loads which are transmitted from the new roof structure. A flat to pitch roof conversion uses a lightweight galvanised steel frame to fit over the existing flat roof. The framework provides support for a new pitched metal roof. The conversion can incorporate additional habitable space within the new roof structure which will depend upon the result of a structural survey and the layout of the existing services and access. Additional low-density mineral wool insulation can be added on top of the old roof to improve u-values and reduce heat loss from the building and the new structure can support a standing seam system for the new roof, especially suitable where the pitch is low. For greater pitch, a through-fix trapezoidal profile can be fitted.

Vapour Control

It is important to recognise and address the need for including a Vapour Check or perhaps a breather paper if the roof being refurbished cannot be adequately sealed. This is an essential consideration to avoid the problem of interstitial condensation. Old building and the construction details they employed, were by their nature very 'leaky' with air and vapour movement not controlled. Over-cladding or over-sheeting will generally require the introduction of a vapour control layer (VCL) above the internal sheet and below the insulation to keep internal moisture out of the roof void and prevent air leakage in line with current building regulations.

What about Rooflights?

The refurbishment of roofs with existing rooflights can be a problem, and generally the client would have to accept a reduced level of light through the rooflight as a result of the introduction of a VCL. Cutting and sealing the VCL around every rooflight could overcome this but can add considerably to the overall cost.

 

WALLS

Steel or Aluminium
Steel and Aluminium systems provide lightweight cladding solution for refurbishment projects. BML Façades are particularly popular, in taking an old and tired building and renovating its appearance to a highly modern and attractive finish.

Use the existing structure

One of the most sustainable approaches to construction is to refurbish an existing structure. Euroclad products and systems lend themselves to refurbishment applications perfectly and can help achieve a faster, more cost-effective build with less local disruption and reduced environmental impact, giving a new lease of life to a previously undesirable building. Modern methods of construction and innovative materials can transform tired and outdated buildings into attractive and inspiring places. In addition to the social benefits, refurbishments  can be more economical even when the complete building envelope needs replacing. The majority of the building fabric can be retained, saving a significant amount of time and money. In addition, by reusing the functioning parts of the building, the impact on the environment is lowered, with material production and transport being greatly reduced.

Over-cladding

Over-cladding is often the best option for refurbishing existing walls which have come to the end of their functional life or become uneconomic to repair. This method of refurbishment avoids the cost of stripping and disposing of the redundant material, minimises the disruption to occupancy and allows uninterrupted use of the building. Not all walls are suitable and consideration must be given to the structural stability of the original framing and secondary purlins.
Refurbishing walls can improve building performance and solve the problem of a failing wall construction, whilst completely updating the look of a building, turning an eyesore into an icon. Euroclad offer a wide range of solutions to suit your pocket and requirements.

Refurbishment Solutions

There are many situations when it can make more sense to refurbish and upgrade a building rather than demolish it and start again. Metal profiled sheets are ideal for refurbishment as a replacement or over-cladding solution. Each refurbishment solution can be tailored to the building owner's requirements and to the character of the project. The main categories of wall refurbishment are outlined below.

Flat and trapezoidal profile over-cladding for walls

Over-cladding is the most effective and the simplest way to transform the appearance of any building. Profiled metal cladding can be fitted to any existing wall material and additional insulation can be added  to improve thermal performance. A wide range of smooth and angular profiles combined with the choice of laying sheets vertically, horizontally or even diagonally means that there is a plethora of choice when it comes to building aesthetics. Profiled over-cladding can provide a system which will insulate and protect an old building with the option for the wall to reflect a corporate image or design aspirations. Profiled sheeting can also be installed as an entire wall system if the old wall is removed.

Façade panel system

Flat panel façade systems can be used to refurbish existing brick, stone or concrete walls or failing panel-based cladding systems. The façade panels can be fixed to a supporting grid, which is anchored to the existing walls. Panels are usually manufactured from aluminium composite material (ACM) or aluminium but other materials are available including pre-finished steel, anodised aluminium and metal composite materials (MCM).

Rainscreen Cladding

A ventilated rainscreen incorporating insulation will allow the building fabric to breath without the risk of interstitial condensation or structural decay. External wall insulation used in this way is superior in performance since as it eliminates the condensation risks associated with internal or cavity wall insulation. This is particularly important for refurbishment schemes. The air gap provides ventilation and it may also assist in providing pressure equalisation across the outer skin, depending on the design of the rainscreen. MCMs, incorporating ACM, are proving to be increasingly popular materials for use in refurbishment projects as they are light, strong and durable, providing less of a strain on the building structure than heavier options. MCM can provide a mirror-like smoothness and can appear flatter than glass. It can be produced in a range of colours and can provide excellent colour consistency, offering architects design freedom which other materials cannot deliver.

Booth Muirie's Guide to Designing AD B2 Compliant Multi Layered Walls Featuring Rainscreen Panel Systems Formed From ACM

There have recently been a number of high profile fires featured in the international press, which feature a rainscreen façade as part of a multi-layered wall construction.  Whilst these events happened overseas, fire risk needs no passport, which led us to thinking about what advice we can give to our customers, and the ACM rainscreen industry, here in the UK.

As a leading fabricator of rainscreens formed from aluminium composite material (ACM), we take our obligation to providing sound advice and appropriate support very seriously.  So, we decided that it would be beneficial to clarify the routes to compliance. 

With that in mind Nick Jenkins has produced a useful report, drawing on the combined intelligence and knowledge of industry experts, entitled “Designing Approved Document B2 Compliant Multi Layered Walls Featuring Rainscreen Panel Systems Formed from Aluminium Composite Material (ACM).”

Not the catchiest title but this report has been designed to be a plain-speaking, honest and impartial assessment of the various options available and their suitability to achieving compliance.

We want to make it clear that the designer is responsible for the compliance of an installed multi-wall system featuring an ACM rainscreen panel system.  And the tag ‘designer’ can be applied to any individual that influences the construction of the building.

With this publication we aim to give you the information you need to minimise risk and achieve compliance, and we are confident that this document does exactly that.

To download a copy of this Booth Muirie Technical Report - Click here

Send us your Technical enquiry by using the web form, you can easily add in files to the enquiry, please include as much data as possible to enable a quick response.

Send us an enquiry